IdeaMensch

In our world the most important quality to have, and the strongest most powerful emotion to have, is kindness.

Chairman of the board and CEO of Braidy Industries Inc., Craig Bouchard, seems to have the Midas touch with every business enterprise he has ever encountered. Now, his goal is to change the economic face of Ashland Kentucky.

 

By Chad Hedrick

ASHLAND, Ky. (WSAZ) — They came with the promise that they were going to bring hundreds of high-paying jobs to a region that’s been hit hard by job loss. Now, those people who were left without work are waiting for Braidy Industries to open their doors.

“This is a geographic area that has gone through a tough couple of decades,” said Braidy Industries CEO Craig Bouchard.

After major employers such as AK Steel went idle, hundreds became unemployed. For them this means hope…

 

By FRED PACE

The Herald-Dispatch

ASHLAND – Braidy Industries says its $1.68 billion aluminum mill project in Eastern Kentucky is moving forward, according to what it called a fact sheet released by the company Tuesday in response to questions posed to it by news media.

Braidy is seeking to raise a total of $500 million in capital through the sale of its common stock. As of Nov. 26, Braidy had about 560 investors, including those who have subscribed via the Netcapital portal. Subscriptions via the Netcapital portal currently total 673,250 shares at $18 per share, for a commitment total of $12,118,500, according to the fact sheet. That amounts to about 2.5 percent of what the company hopes to raise.

In addition to unaccredited investors investing through the Netcapital portal, materially more than 100 institutional funds and accredited investors have purchased Braidy shares directly from Braidy in private placement transactions…

 

Our View

The Ashland Alliance’s annual banquet on Thursday night was a great event for all the right reasons.

We’ve been to many of these types of gatherings across the nation over the years. Some have true meaning. Some don’t. This one definitely had meaning because it highlighted actual, concrete momentum building in the economic development field in the region.

The keynote address was from Braidy Industries Chief Executive Officer Craig Bouchard. It was an informative presentation because Bouchard talked about the technology Braidy is developing, the commitment to the mill and the strategy for getting it all done. Bouchard talked about Braidy’s “building a community — not a company.” Bouchard also made a presentation aimed at area youth, highlighting keys to success in life. And, Bouchard made some much-needed comments about the need for all of us to set aside political divisiveness and work together for a common good…

 

The Herald-Dispatch

ASHLAND — A $4 million grant to do site preparation work at the location of the proposed $1.68 billion Braidy Industries aluminum rolling mill was announced by Kentucky officials this week.

The Abandoned Mine Lands pilot grant was awarded by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Abandoned Mine Lands to Northeast Kentucky Regional Industrial Park Authority as part of a program to revitalize the coalfields in Kentucky’s Appalachian region, officials said. U.S. Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin announced the award.

“The northeastern region is thriving with new, innovative opportunities, and this grant supports Braidy Industries’ plans to provide jobs to our highly skilled, readily available workforce. It also paves the way for future economic development opportunities and helps us reimagine Kentucky’s Appalachian region as a major manufacturing hub,” Rogers said during a ceremony announcing the grant at the EastPark Industrial Center…

 

The Lane Report

ASHLAND, Ky. — U.S. Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05), U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Governor Matt Bevin today announced a $4 million Abandoned Mine Lands Pilot Grant to do site preparation work at the EastPark Industrial Park.

The grant was awarded by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Abandoned Mine Lands to Northeast Kentucky Regional Industrial Park Authority (EastPark), as part of the 2017 Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot Program to revitalize the coalfields in Kentucky’s Appalachian region.

The project will involve installing a grid of aggregate and concrete support piers and columns on a 300-acre site that will support the weight of the planned, 2.5 million square-foot, Braidy Industries aluminum rolling mill that will produce material mainly for the automotive industry…

 

By MIKE JAMES

A $4 million grant to the EastPark Industrial Center will help prepare the site of the planned Braidy Industries aluminum plant.

The money will come from the Abandoned Mine Lands Pilot program, according to fifth district U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers, who unveiled the grant Wednesday at the industrial park.

“The northeast region is thriving with new innovative opportunities and this grant supports Braidy Industries’ plans to provide jobs to our highly skilled, readily available workforce,” Rogers said…

 

The Messenger-Inquirer newspaper in Kentucky reported on a community forum held this week by Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin. At the event in Greenville, Bevin documented the important role aluminum can play in furthering the economy of the state of Kentucky.

The newspaper quoted Bevin as saying:

“There’s no state in America that has attracted more aluminum mills, steel mills, smelters (or) foundries than has Kentucky in the last couple of years,” he said. “Because, if we can get them here and we can produce the raw materials here, then the people who heat treat it, cold-roll it, hot-roll it, slit it, anneal it, fabricate it, bend it, weld it — that entire supply chain — are more likely to come here. It’s more likely to be here, because, from a logistical standpoint, the product itself is here.”

We agree. We believe the governor, his economic development team and all of the ongoing private-sector efforts — combined with the work of local governments and economic development officials across the state– are combining to lay the groundwork for something potentially major unfolding throughout the state when it comes to job growth…

 

By ADAM BEAM

ASHLAND, Ky. (AP) — Things fall through for Chris Jackson.

A construction job, promised if he completed a carpentry program, vanished two weeks before his exit exam. A coveted, $100,000-a-year union job at a steel mill disappeared when the plant closed.

Now a businessman is promising him — and more than 130 others — a job at an aluminum mill in eastern Kentucky if he can complete a two-year degree program with at least a B average and no positive drug tests. But the mill is not built, and its financing is not complete. It’s a big risk for Jackson, a 41-year-old who turned down two other jobs hundreds of miles away for the chance to stay in his hometown.

It’s also a risk for Kentucky taxpayers. The state has offered its usual package of economic incentives to the company, Braidy Industries. But in a rare move, the state legislature unanimously approved a $15 million investment in the project, making taxpayers partial owners of the mill. Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, seeking re-election in 2019, has touted the project as evidence of his leadership to bring jobs to Appalachia, where steady work that pays well has been hard to find…

 

By MARK MAYNARD, Kentucky Today

Braidy Industries opened a comprehensive stock offering to potential investors on Tuesday in New York City, showcasing a business plan to revitalize the Appalachian region’s sagging economy and receiving a strong endorsement from Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin.

Chief Executive Officer Craig T. Bouchard and other Braidy executives presented to investors the company’s plans for a $1.68 billion aluminum mill at the EastPark Industrial Center in Ashland and discussed how they will utilize advanced manufacturing technologies designed to make vehicles, airplanes and other forms of transportation lighter.